Marine Ducroux-Gazio

(Fr | January,2021)

Marine Ducroux-Gazio

Knots, weave, and icebergs of meaning. Fears. Spaces that are absorbed, a world that is curled up. What has been knotted up, what is unravelling. Trips in space, blinding earthly perspectives, quest for another real. Strata, fear. Shipwreck, uncertainties, islands. Deeper and deeper in the waters of the body, attempt to return to time.

I developed a work encompassing both formal preoccupations, organic questions, stratas of perceptions, and an interest in literature, anthropology, ecologies and craftsmanship.                        

Parallel to my studies in fine arts, I travelled during long periods in order to find new materials, forms, process and a global perspective. Those experiences allowed me to develop researches about myths, rituals, cosmogonies and human relations to other beings and things.

In 2019 I studied in Tokyo traditional Japanese textiles, including weaving, felting, and traditional dyeing technics. In 2020, I had the opportunity to learn to weave on back strap loom in a women’s community in Chiapas. I see craftsmanship, and particularly textiles, as forms and processes that make signs, in that they contain the history, temporality and cosmogony of where they are made, and the trace of the one who built it. Textile works also contain the ideas of stratums, trace, timeless, and paradoxically of ephemeral and fragility, all in all of an impossible archeology.

Although my work brings together a variety of mediums, I consider it to be essentially sculptural in that it assembles materials in space in order to create communicating signs. Sculpture integrates its own language, and it is from this angle that I am interested in it: to ask questions in a sensitive perspective, to call to it, to open a time.

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@marin_gazio

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The Lab Program is an Art-Research & Mobility Network that works in collaboration with independent spaces, art and non-art related, in Mexico City in order to exchange methodologies and encourage site-specific researches as part of artistic practice.